Random Thoughts

about reading, writing, and anything else that interests me

The most powerful technology resources

Wesley Fryer’s Moving at the Speed of Creativity podcast the other day was the audio portion of a talk he gave to a group of teachers in a professional development workshop. It was called Blending Learning with Powerful Ingredients.

I don’t always get around to listening to podcasts, but this is one I am very glad I did. He talked about not just doing the same old thing that we have always been doing. It isn’t enough to use technology to tell students to read pages 6-20 and answer questions 1-10. I’ve talked about this before, and it is something that I really struggle with in my own practice.

The other thing I took away from the podcast was Wesley’s picks as the most powerful tech tools or resources. After asking the participants to come up with their own lists, he talked about del.icio.us, flickr, voicethread, and skype. While I use all four extensively, I haven’t used them as much with students as I would like. I have used flickr extensively, but that is about it. I need to think about how I can use the others more.

Anyway, it was a great podcast. You have probably listened to it already, but if not, check it out!

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One thought on “The most powerful technology resources

  1. Wesley Fryer on said:

    I’m glad you gave that podcast a listen, Nancy. Marco Torres was the original source for that line that we’ve been asking kids to read pages 1-20 and answer questions 1-10 since the days when we lived in caves. I think it is really important not to get overwhelmed with all the different web 2 tools available, and that’s why I’m wanting to focus on “powerful ingredients.” This line of thinking has inspired Karen Montgomery and I to start a new wiki called Educational Technology Gourmet, and we’re half-seriously playing with the idea of writing a book on this topic/theme. I really like the cooking analogy for teaching.

    I appreciate your feedback on the podcast, and again want to say thanks for sharing it. Good luck as you continue to integrate these technology tools and others with your students. Have a Merry Christmas!

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