August Reading, part 2

OK, it’s time to finish this up.

Speculative Fiction:

  • Dragons Rising by Daniel Arenson was the last one in the trilogy that I started in July. I absolutely loved all three books! As I think I said before, this is only one set of books that takes place in the same world. I want to read them all! Arenson creates really wonderful characters, and they are put in really difficult positions. They aren’t always victorious, but they always do the right thing. I can’t say enough good things about these books!
  • The Book of Deacon by Joseph R. Lallo was one of the first ebooks I ever got, and it took me five years to read it! Amazon lists it as being for grades 6-12, but I found nothing juvenile in it. The story was a good one, and I liked the characters. Reading some of the reviews on Amazon, I find that not everyone agrees with me (Surprise, surprise!) but plenty of people do. I recommend this book highly. I plan to read more of the series before long.
  • The Wrong Girl by C.J. Archer was a book I got after finishing another book in another series by the same author. I am really glad I did! A case of mistaken identity gets one girl kidnapped so her powers as a firestarter can be developed. While that situation gets ironed out, I was left wondering about the other girl, the one who supposedly should have been taken instead. But it didn’t bother me enough to detract from the story. I would like to read more in this series as I am becoming a real fan of CJ Archer!
  • Game On by R.E. Rowe seemed to me like a cross between Cory Doctorow’s Little Brother and Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game.  It was a great story. Again, Amazon says it’s for 5th – 12th grades, and that might account for the fact that it was an easy read, but the story really carried me along. Sure, the characters are kids, but they were interesting kids with talents and abilities that they were willing to use to save the world. More than the world, actually. If you liked either Doctorow’s or Card’s books, you will likely enjoy this book.
  • I got The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu from Tor as part of their ebook club. I didn’t get it read during July, but I guess that doesn’t matter. I really enjoyed this book.  It is different from US-style science fiction in many ways — maybe more dense, less action. But I really, really liked it! There is a lot of political history there, which may not appeal to some but which made it even more interesting to me. It starts during the Cultural Revolution, and the shifting political tides entered into the story. I knew a woman whose professor parents were sent to the countryside for re-education during the Cultural Revolution, so it was interesting to me to read more aout it here. History and politics playsa part in the story, but it is definitely science fiction.And excellent science fiction, at that!
  • A Book Without Dragons by Olivia Berrier, while certainly not about dragons, is about the role of magic in our lives — the kind of magic we can create for ourselves and for others. It is a very upbeat, optimistic book. Some people won’t like it at all for that very reason, but I liked it a lot. Is it the best book I’ve ever read? No. Was it worth reading? Yes. I hope you will give it a try.

And the short fiction:

  • Witch Hunt by Annie Bellet came in a collection I purchased some time ago and have slowly been working my way through.  I like Bellet’s writing. As I have said before, I am not as much a fan of novellas or other short fiction as I am of longer novels, but I liked this one. The story was good and kept my interest. The characters include a unicorn — the only thing that really gave me any pause in the whole book. I think I skimmed over his involvement! But give this book a try. I think you;ll like it.
  • Forged in Blood by K.F. Breene was another in that collection, and I am unable to find it anywhere at Amazon or Kobo. It seems to be a prequel to Chosen, which I now want to read. This was a good book, and I really enjoyed reading it.

So that’s it for August.

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